Miss GayDayS Pageant brings out the freaks and the fun with a Tim Burton flair

By : Billy Manes
Comments: 0

Anyone who knows their wig understands that Miss GayDayS is a really big deal. This year, contestants brought the dark into the light – with a splash of steampunk smoke at any given moment – and wowed the Doubletree host hotel into a frenzy that included people banging on walls (which is the new “clapping”) and more finger snaps than we could ever count.

A vaunted panel of various judges representing both the trans and drag communities saw through the clouds of wonderment. In the end, we welcomed Miss GayDayS 2017 Naliyah Rome Valentino to her well-earned crown. Congratulations all around!

Continue Reading >>

Screened Out – Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

By : Stephen Miller
Comments: 0

Eva Green, Asa Butterfield, Judi Dench, Samuel L. Jackson, Chris O’Dowd, Allison Janney, Terrence Stamp

Tim Burton peddles in peculiar stuff like Miss Peregrine. So it is no wonder he opted to film Ransom Riggs’s famous YA story (or a version thereof – this expands the first book significantly). It’s a tale of gifted, perpetual children and the bird-women who protect them from extinction.

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children presents a fascinating and wondrous world. It also introduces intriguing characters. Finally, there is no shortage of that brilliant Tim Burton visual style. And yet what it often lacks is something that hollows out many other Burton films: storytelling cohesiveness.

Continue Reading >>

Screened Out – Alice Through the Looking Glass

By : Stephen Miller
Comments: 0

Johnny Depp, Mia Wasikowska, Helena Bonham Carter, Sacha Baron Cohen, Anne Hathaway, Alan Rickman

It’s the same complaint as the first Alice – the last one directed by Tim Burton, this one produced by him. Lewis Carroll’s original characters are always so much more interesting – and much, much more absurd – than this. To use such colorful personalities to tell such a dour, boring story is a crime.

Off with their heads!

Continue Reading >>

Screened Out – Krampus

By : Stephen Miller
Comments: 0

Adam Scott, Toni Collette, David Koechner, Allison Tolman, Conchata Ferrell, Emjay Anthony, Krista Stadler

There are probably hundreds of reasons for landing on Santa’s naughty list. One is not living up to potential – that note many of us got on our grade school report cards. This darkly comic horror flick also gets that comment.

The legend of Krampus is a little-known Slavian mythology that faded in the early 1900s. In that story, terrible kids don’t just get coal in their stockings at Christmas; they get dragged to Hell. Krampus – Google him, really, it’s worth it – is this super creepy black demon who punishes the brats. He beats them with sticks, he stuffs them into his basket, and he takes them to the underworld. In Hades, these rotten children are slaves for a year, or they’re burnt in eternal flames, or they just get eaten by long-tongued Krampus. Their fate depends on which version of the myth you like best.

Continue Reading >>

Screened Out – Big Eyes

By : Stephen Miller
Comments: 0

Amy Adams, Christoph Waltz, Jason Schwartzman, Krystal Ritter, Terence Stamp, Danny Huston

No wonder Burton was attracted to this; it’s a fascinating story.

We’ve all seen the paintings, those creepy, sad waifs with the oversized pupils. The “big eyes” prints – like their counterparts from Warhol’s factory, Pollack works, and copies from early 20th-century Russians like Kandinsky – were everywhere in the late ‘50s and 60s. These pieces were being mass-produced; people were no longer ashamed to frame cheap copies for their homes.

It was cataclysmic change in the art world, predicating huge jumps in modern art prices, the rise of pop artists as stars, and the birth of the art print business. That sort of seismic shift was also coming elsewhere – for women in the work world and the rights of single mothers. Unfortunately, for Margaret Keane, the world around her wasn’t quite there yet, still stuck in the1950s chauvinistic society.

Continue Reading >>

Watermark’s 2014 Orlando Fringe Reviews: Oyster Boy

By : Veronica Brezina
Comments: 0

Being a fan of dark Tim Burton stories, I never expected his story The Melancholy Death of Oyster Boy to ever become a musical show. But to my greatest surprise and delight, the storytelling was done flawlessly and with swift, efficient puppeteer movement.

Oyster Boy, inspired by Tim Burton’s The Melancholy Death of Oyster Boy and Other Stories, is a dark comedy with the moral life lesson of how being different (in this case, deformed with having an oyster shell-shaped head) in a world where beauty is key, comes with great consequences.

Continue Reading >>