‘Money Detox’ book raising money for suicide prevention services

By : Jeremy Williams
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ORLANDO | “The Money Coach” Tammy Lally has been on a mission, and that mission is to help everyday people get out from underneath what she calls “money shame.”

Lally, in an interview with Watermark last September, said money shame is defined as “the intensely painful feeling or experience of believing that we are flawed and therefore unworthy of love and belonging based on our bank account balances, our debts, our homes, our cars and our job titles.”

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We look back on 2018, a midterm year for a country that’s just living on a prayer

By : Jeremy Williams and Ryan Williams-Jent
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It’s been two years since we, as a country, entered into the reality that is the Trump Administration. The country feels more divided than ever and the phrases “fake news” and “it’s all a witch hunt” are commonplace.

The violence that seems to define who Americans are these days is also there, particularly in Florida, where there has been no justice for the five transgender women of color who were murdered and yet another mass shooting—this time at a high school in Parkland, Fla.—pulled the focus of the world to our state.

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The taboo subject of money and why not talking about your finances can be detrimental

By : Jeremy Williams
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“Have you ever had to break your family’s rules? Today, I’m breaking mine around money, secrecy and shame.”

That was the opening line of Tammy Lally’s 2017 TED Talk, but for Lally that is more than just the opening line to her lecture, it also describes her personal money journey.Lally is a Certified Money Coach and author of the new book, “Money Detox: Your Invitation to Liberation.” Her journey started in 2006 with a phone call from her brother on his 40th birthday.

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09.06.18 Publisher’s Desk

By : Rick Claggett
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I’ve been told I communicate too much. I really am an open book and there isn’t much I won’t talk about, no matter how personal it is. I also tend to divulge all the information I have when telling a story. It’s strange to me that everyone doesn’t do this, yet I assume they do anyway. This often gets me in trouble with my roommate.

“Why did she do that?” she asks when I’m done with my story. To which I reply, “I’ve given you all the information I have.” “Why didn’t you ask more questions?” she retorts. I explain that I just go by the information people give me. She calls me weird and I call her weird. After 18 years of living together, I assure you we are both weird.

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