Never again, but why now?

By : Jamie Hyman
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In the weeks since a shooter killed 17 at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., survivors have been featured in a town hall on national television, visited the Florida Legislature and led a march of more than a million protesters nationwide, demanding sensible gun control.

In the weeks following the shooting at Pulse nightclub in 2016, the levels of advocacy and response were far more muted, which is forcing members of the LGBTQ community to wonder why, after a mass shooting that at the time was the deadliest in U.S. history, government officials, the media and the Pulse survivors with the volume and intensity that are leading millions to take action today.

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Central Florida’s Overheard: Remembering Billy Manes through activism

By : anonymous
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The Pride Fund To End Gun Violence’s Orlando Reception, held at The Abbey on March 14, was not only an event to kick off the Political Action Committee’s 2018 election efforts, but also to officially launch the Billy Manes Advocacy Fellowship.

“Billy was on our board and he had such a history of activism and advocacy when he passed away, in his honor we created Billy Manes Advocacy Fellowship,” says Pride Fund founder and executive director Jason Lindsay. “D.C. is where a lot of people love to go for their internships, which is great because they can gain valuable work experience there, but it’s expensive. Now most internships are unpaid, so we created a fellowship program with the specific goal of helping with that financial burden.”

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Pride Fund To End Gun Violence looks to the November mid-terms for answers

By : Jeremy Williams
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Pride Fund To End Gun Violence founder and executive director Jason Lindsay remembers in detail the moment he decided to start the organization.

“It all began the day of Pulse,” Lindsay recalls. “I was watching the news like so many other people and saw the tragedy unfold and a pivotal moment was seeing a mom, Christine Leinonen, who was waiting to find out whether her son had survived or not, and she pleaded in a clip that’s been played over and over again asking for somebody to please do something about the assault weapons.”

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Students walk out of class to protest gun violence

By : Michael K. Lavers OF THE WASHINGTON BLADE, COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL LGBT MEDIA ASSOCIATION
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ABOVE: Thousands of students participated in the National Student Walkout march and rally against gun violence at the U.S. Capitol on March 14, 2018. Washington Blade photo by Michael K. Lavers.

Thousands of students who walked out of class on Wednesday in protest of gun violence marched from the White House to the U.S. Capitol.

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Parkland shooting inspires new calls for gun reform. Will it be enough?

By : Chris Johnson OF THE WASHINGTON BLADE, COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL LGBT MEDIA ASSOCIATION
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ABOVE: Gay candidates are seizing upon the energy for gun control after the Parkland shooting. Screen capture courtesy of ABC News YouTube.

In the aftermath of America’s most recent mass shooting — a tragedy at a high school in Parkland, Fla., that left 17 dead — gun control has emerged as a defining issue ahead of the congressional mid-term elections and LGBT candidates are among those bringing it the forefront.

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Orlando’s Overheard: Love, honor and remember

By : Anonymous
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Love is Love

Earlier this year we mentioned that MegaCon Orlando —the Southeast’s largest comics, sci-fi and gaming event —in conjunction with comic book writer Marc Andreyko of DC Comics hosted the “Love is Love” fundraiser in honor of the victims from the Pulse tragedy.

Andreyko, you may recall, was the project organizer for the graphic novel Love Is Love, the oversize comic containing tributes to the victims of Pulse and celebrating the LGBTQ community.

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Hundreds turn out for D.C. vigil for Pulse victims

By : Lou Chibbaro Jr. of the Washington Blade courtesy of the National Gay Media Association
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D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser joined several hundred people in Dupont Circle Monday night in a candlelight vigil to commemorate the first-year anniversary of the June 12, 2016 shooting rampage at the gay nightclub Pulse in Orlando, Fla., that claimed the lives of 49 mostly LGBT people.

Many of those attending Monday night’s vigil wept as D.C. gay activist Jose Gutierrez, co-founder of D.C.’s Latino Pride, read the names and ages of the 49 mostly Latino LGBT people who were shot to death in what authorities say was the worst mass shooting incident in U.S. history.

Another 53 Pulse patrons were wounded in the incident before police shot and killed the perpetrator, Omar Mateen, 29, who police said had targeted Pulse for a hate crime and a terrorist attack that he carried out with a powerful assault rifle.

“We are here today for a very important reason,” said Jason Lindsay, founder and executive director of the national political action committee Pride Fund to End Gun Violence, which organized the vigil.

“We are here to reflect and to mark the one year since the Pulse tragedy,” he said. “It was one year ago that the horror was being told.”

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Groups form in the wake of Pulse to better explain, correct our problem with mass violence

By : Billy Manes
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There have been numerous efforts to make sense – and sociological advancement – following the attack at Pulse Orlando on June 12.

Look around you. There are murals everywhere, scenes of righteous indignations, ribbon-makers delivering rainbows to celebrities, candlelight tributes, attempts to curb the seeming necessity to take those out with whom you do not agree. Orlando is America’s tipping point on both the LGBTQ and gun-violence fronts, and many of those who are most affected are seeking change to make things better. You can say “intersectionality” in terms of protest all you want, but here, now, it is manifest. These are but a few of the bright spots to come from that dark night. Orlando is coming together; you can help.

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