Stay Proud, Be Loud

By : Maia Monet
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The Matthew Shepard Foundation and Miller Lite invite you out for their third “Stay Proud, Be Loud” community discussion on hate crimes. They will discuss Pulse, the hate crime rate in Central Florida and the work they are doing in their 20th anniversary year to combat hate in America. The event will be two parts with a panel discussion starting at 3:00 p.m. and a reception following at 5:00 p.m.

Art Night Out: Let’s Get Plastered

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Portraiture takes many forms, and working three-dimensionally yields remarkably lifelike results. In this workshop with Brenda Bartnick you will learn how to cast body parts or items with plaster gauze. This process was made famous in the art world by the late artist George Segal, whose work can be seen in the in OMA galleries. Plaster casting is a two person process, so participants must sign up in pairs. Dress for a mess, bring a date or a friend, enjoy complementary drinks, and cast lifelike memories at Art Night Out!

5.5.16 Editor’s Desk

By : Billy Manes
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Billy Manes

Billy Manes

It was a sweaty, stinky mess lingering beneath swaying light bulbs and an odd sense (scent?) of danger – bathrooms not necessarily included. At least that was the hurry-up-and-wait feeling that I got upon my arrival via tarnished spaceship in Orlando in 1997, plopped down in the middle of theater festival without a theater or air conditioning. The Orlando Fringe never existed on pretense, though, so postscript stands second only the euphoria of the moment, right next to that strange guy looking at you like you’re a strange guy, then laughing and the barriers being broken on stage. Orlando and Fringe were a match made in heaven. In the late ‘90s, the Fringe stood in stark contrast to the Lou Pearlman boy-band brigade seeking to whiten the city’s teeth. It was Haight-Ashbury more than hating ass-berries, and as such, it was the de facto cultural clutch the city needed.

Make no mistake, the Orlando Fringe is this town’s matted underdog made good. For every quizzical glance into maladroit disorders and kinky extroversion, there have always been bright eyes staring toward trails of glitter lighting up the path to the colors of its venues, the talent of its participants, the magic of theater on a shoestring. It’s a messy affair, but most good things are. It’s also the place where performance comes from: within not without. And as such, Orlando’s Fringe festival, the longest winding road in this country (if you don’t count actual roads but only the histrionic ones), it’s earned its place in Central Florida’s kaleidoscopic pantheon.

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Before US, gay marriage accepted in parts of world

By : Wire Report
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LONDON (AP) – The U.S. Supreme Court’s refusal this month to review rulings that overturned bans on same-sex marriage marked a milestone in gay rights in the United States. Around the world, many countries have come to accept such unions as part of the tapestry of everyday life. But there are still pockets of resistance. Here is a look at some countries that have made same-sex marriage common practice:

BRITAIN WAITS, ACCEPTS:

In 1992, five same-sex couples in London applied for marriage licenses in one of the opening salvos of the battle for what campaigners call “marriage equality.”

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