Pioneering transgender singer Jackie Shane dead at 78

By : wire report
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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) | Jackie Shane, a black transgender soul singer who became a pioneering musician in Toronto where she packed out nightclubs in the 1960s, has died. She was 78.

Record label Numero Group, which produced a Grammy-nominated album about Shane that brought her back out into the spotlight, confirmed Feb. 22 that she died in Nashville, Tennessee. The exact date and cause of death were not provided.

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Memphis mother and son run LGBTQ magazine, radio show

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MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) | Gwendolyn Clemons and her son Davin have a lot in common.

They both are gay.

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Kansas governor signs ‘religious freedom’ anti-LGBTQ adoption law

By : Chris Johnson OF THE WASHINGTON BLADE, COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL LGBT MEDIA ASSOCIATION
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Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer has signed anti-LGBTQ adoption legislation making his state the latest to enact a “religious freedom” law enabling taxpayer-funded agencies to deny placement into LGBTQ homes.

Colyer signed the legislation, Senate Bill 284, into law on Friday, according to a local media report. The Washington Blade has placed a call in with Colyer’s office seeking confirmation that he signed the bill.

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Mom says bisexual Mississippi 6th grader hanged self over bullying

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SOUTHAVEN, Miss. (AP) — The parents of a 6th grade-boy in Mississippi who hanged himself in the family garage say he was bullied at school after saying he might be bisexual.

WREG-TV reports that 12-year-old Andy Leach left a note for his family before killing himself on March 6. His parents, Cheryl Hudson and Matt Leach, say they learned after his death that other Southaven Middle School students called their son worthless and ugly and threatened to beat him up.

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Gay pride parade organizers sue Mississippi city over denial

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JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Two women sued a Mississippi college town Monday over its denial of a permit for a gay pride parade, saying the city had denied their constitutional rights to free expression and equal protection.

Mississippi State University students Bailey McDaniel and Emily Turner filed the federal lawsuit Monday against the city of Starkville, asking a judge to overrule the city and immediately grant a parade permit to Starkville Pride.

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Mom calls gay bar for advice after son comes out

By : MARIAH COOPER OF THE WASHINGTON BLADE, COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL LGBT MEDIA ASSOCIATION
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A mother decided to reach out to a gay bar for advice after her son came out to her as gay.

Bartender Kara Coley, who works at Sipps in Gulfport, Mississippi, recounted the conversation she had with a woman who called the bar while Coley was working her shift.

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Supreme Court won’t hear challenge to Mississippi anti-LGBT law

By : Chris Johnson OF THE WASHINGTON BLADE, COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL LGBT MEDIA ASSOCIATION
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The U.S. Supreme Court won’t take up legal challenges to a Mississippi “religious freedom” law enabling sweeping discrimination against LGBT people, leaving extremely limited recourse to combat the anti-LGBT statute.

In an orders list on Monday, the Supreme Court announced it had rejected two petitions for certiorari — one filed by legal groups in the lawsuit Barber v. Bryant, the other filed by legal groups in Campaign for Southern Equality v. Bryant — as well as a series of other petitions pending before the Supreme Court.

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Mississippi gay marriage law affects college baseball

By : wire report
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Photo from State University of New York Stony Brook athletics web site

HATTIESBURG, Miss. (AP) — College baseball is affected by a Mississippi law that lets government clerks or private business people cite their own religious beliefs to deny services to same-sex couples.

The Sun Herald reports the University of Southern Mississippi was supposed to play three games in Hattiesburg in late February against Stony Brook University. The games were canceled because New York Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo banned all non-essential state travel to Mississippi after Republican Gov. Phil Bryant signed the law in 2016.

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Mississippi law endorses anti-LGBT bias, attorneys argue

By : wire report
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JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A Mississippi law unconstitutionally endorses specific religious beliefs that could lead to discrimination against people who support same-sex marriage, gay rights advocates said Tuesday in written arguments to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The high court has not said whether it will consider a dispute over the law that lets government workers and private business people cite their own religious beliefs to deny services to lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender people.

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Mississippi woman seeks parental rights in same-sex divorce

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JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – The Mississippi Supreme Court will hear the case Wednesday on whether 44-year-old Chris Strickland should be listed as the legal parent of now-6-year-old Zayden Strickland.

A lower court judge ruled during the divorce that Strickland wasn’t a parent. He said the anonymous sperm donor had paternal rights, and awarded full custody rights to Kimberly Day, who carried a child who bears Strickland’s last name.

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Attorneys defend Mississippi law on denying LGBT services

By : Wire Report
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JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Attorneys for Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant are defending a state law that lets government workers and private business people cite religious beliefs to deny services to LGBT people.

In arguments filed Monday to the U.S. Supreme Court, they wrote that the law protects people from being penalized for refusing to participate in activities they consider “immoral,” such as same-sex marriage.

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Judge allows new route to challenge Mississippi LGBTQ law

By : Wire Report
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JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A gay rights group is getting another chance to challenge a Mississippi law that lets government workers and private business people cite their own religious beliefs to refuse services to LGBTQ people.

Legal experts say it’s the broadest religious-objections law enacted by any state since the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage nationwide in 2015.

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