Watch: Christina Aguilera spills ‘Mickey Mouse Club’ secrets on ‘Carpool Karaoke’

By : MARIAH COOPER OF THE WASHINGTON BLADE, COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL LGBT MEDIA ASSOCIATION
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ABOVE: Christina AguileraMelissa McCarthy and James Corden in ‘Carpool Karaoke.’ Screenshot via YouTube.

Christina Aguilera joined James Corden for an edition of “Carpool Karaoke” on “The Late, Late Show with James Corden” on Monday.

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Screened Out – Ghostbusters

By : Stephen Miller
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Kristen Wiig, Melissa McCarthy, Kate McKinnon, Leslie Jones, Chris Hemsworth, Neil Casey

From the get-go, this reboot of the original Ghostbusters faced questions of legitimacy. The ‘80s classic – though not perfect – is so well loved. The other, uglier spirit haunting this relaunch was the sexist question as to whether female comics could carry the franchise as well as the males did in the first. (We’ll pretend the late-’80s sequel doesn’t exist…)

Well, fear not the unknown, people. The women are wonderful. (Apparently you don’t need a penis to be funny…). Also, the last 45 minutes of this film are excellent. The scenes leading up to the big finale, though, are wispy and dismissible.

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Screened Out – The Boss

By : Stephen Miller
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Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Bell, Peter Dinklage, Kristen Schaal, Kathy Bates

Obnoxious lead character: check.
Bland, put-upon sidekick: check.
Terrible script that follows a formula that fails more often than it works: check.
A few physical gags that are actually surprisingly funny: check.
An easily dismissible, idiot villain: check.

I could halt the review there. The Boss fits in with the worst works by Will Farrell, Adam Sandler, Kevin Hart, and their ilk. I think it’s important, though, to discuss why and how these unfunny comedies keep getting made.

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Screened Out – Spy

By : Stephen Miller
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Melissa McCarthy, Jude Law, Jason Statham, Allison Janney, Rose Byrne, Bobby Cannavale, Miranda Hart

It’s a bit of a flashback to Working Girl, 9 to 5, and Miss Congeniality – comedies embracing a strong feminist bent. The secret weapon in this new action flick – written and directed by Paul Feig (Bridesmaids, The Heat) – is one half Melissa McCarthy comic genius and one half James Bond intrigue. It’s a solid one-two punch, since Bond films are typical sexist and need a woman to show them how to make international intrigue much funnier.

Even with some strong gags and a protagonist we genuinely care about, Spy isn’t as super as it could be. It feels like it needs a few more killer jokes, and McCarthy’s character arc could be tighter and more surprising.

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Award-winning Hollywood luminary talks lesbians, drag and American Horror Story

By : Chris Azzopardi
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Long before dishing lesbian wisdom to Melissa McCarthy’s mess of a character in the summer’s road-trip comedy Tammy, Kathy Bates had the gay community in shackles. It didn’t take a sledgehammer to maintain our obsession with her—it just took the Hollywood icon’s every turn on television Six Feet Under, American Horror Story, Broadway (‘night, Mother) and the big screen (Titanic, Misery).

Notably with Fried Green Tomatoes, her 1991 girl dramedy, and then with Dolores Claiborne and Primary Colors, Bates has kept us captivated for over four decades, bound to her boundless greatness. On Aug. 25, Bates won a Best Supporting Actress Emmy for her role in season 3 of American Horror Story: Coven as the racist witch Marie LaLaurie. The role gained her even more fans, if that’s possible, and the star is slated to appear in the FX mini series’ fourth incarnation set to launch in October.

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Screened Out – Tammy

By : Stephen Miller
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Melissa McCarthy, Susan Sarandon, Toni Collette, Allison Janney, Mark Duplass, Gary Cole, Kathy Bates, Sandra Oh, Dan Aykroyd

The road-trip comedy Tammy was written by McCarthy and her husband (and the film’s director) Ben Falcone. They’re a very funny couple, but their writing feels like a few miles of rough concrete. You’ll laugh during this journey, but you’ll also miss important landmarks like character consistency, arc, and plot points building on one another.

Mostly, Tammy is a goofy summer comedy replete with enough “feel good” to make audiences smile. All the stunt casting either helps or hurts, depending on how often you want to be pulled out of the film, every time you see another familiar face. Often, it feels like they only could schedule some of these actors for one or two days of shooting.

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