Comedian Matteo Lane brings his singing stand-up to Tampa

By : Ryan Williams-Jent
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Comedian Matteo Lane wants you to know that he’s gay. It’s something that he shares almost immediately with his audiences, whether they’re laughing with him on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” or logging onto Netflix for “The Comedy Lineup.”

“I walk up and say, ‘Hi, thanks so much, I’m obviously gay,’” he explains, “and then I move on. It’s a real power move, because I know they’re thinking it and I’m proud of it.” It’s a choice that’s served the classically trained opera singer and painter well, leading to captivated crowds for Comedy Central, Logo, HBO and across the world for his live tour.

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Issue: 26.15 LGBTQ Blue

By : Dylan Todd
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LGBTQ cops talk about being out and proud in Central Florida and Tampa Bay, Orlando LGBTQ pioneer Joel Strack passes away at 59, Flamingo Resort St. Pete announces imminent closure, local news, celebrity interviews, photos, events and much, much more!

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07.25.19 Publisher’s Desk

By : Rick Claggett
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Watermark is in the midst of celebrating 25 years in publication. It’s a huge milestone for many reasons that I will get into in my next column, so stay tuned. However, I bring that up now because—in preparation for the celebration—I am going back through the years and highlighting some of the stories we’ve covered.

You may have noticed these pages popping up toward the end of the past two issues, covering 2014 and 2015. Tom Dyer had done a similar retrospective for the 20th anniversary, so I wanted to carry on the tradition leading up to our 25th anniversary issue slated for late August. In this issue we reflect on 2016, a devastating year in so many respects.

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Come Out With Pride rises to the challenge of healing a community still in a haze of grief

By : Billy Manes
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“In the beginning, everybody was kind of in shock,” Come Out With Pride board secretary and auction chair Deb Ofsowitz says. “It was hard to even talk about it.”

Osfowitz, of course, is referring to the June 12 Pulse massacre that resonated throughout the world; those few minutes of artillery fire that led to the deaths of 49 people and the injuries of 53 more at Pulse Orlando after a Saturday night, before the dawn of Sunday. The board convened immediately, she says, everybody soon after scattering into various public relations poses as public people often do in the face of tragedy.

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