HRC kicks off ‘Equality Act’ campaign with Sally Field and her son Sam Greisman

By : MARIAH COOPER OF THE WASHINGTON BLADE, COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL LGBT MEDIA ASSOCIATION
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Human Rights Campaign launched its new campaign “Americans for the Equality Act,” a video series which features celebrities who support the Equality Act, on Monday. The proposed bill would amend the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

The video series, filmed by award-winning directors Dustin Lance Black and Paris Barclay, kicked off with actress and LGBTQ advocate Sally Field and her gay son, Sam Greisman, as they have a video conference conversation on why the Equality Act is instrumental in ensuring that the LGBTQ community has equal rights across state lines.

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Screened Out – Fifty Shades of Grey

By : Stephen Miller
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Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan, Marcia Gay-Harden

Do you know what’s shocking about Fifty Shades of Grey? It’s dull. This film about a virgin who dips her pinky toe into a BDSM relationship is about as titillating as buying cat litter. There’s hardly enough plot to call this a story.

Not that the source material promised much. I barely got through the bad grammar and simple sentences of the first book, which started as pornographic fan fiction for the Twilight books. According to snarky legend, enough bored housewives loved it that E.L. James removed the copyrighted stuff and made it a bodice ripper replete with semi-kinky sex and glamorous living. Not being one for understatement, James gave her characters the grandiloquent names Anastasia Steel and Christian Grey.

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Screened Out – Magic in the Moonlight

By : Stephen Miller
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Colin Firth, Emma Stone, Marcia Gay Harden, Jackie Weaver, Simon McBurney

Woody Allen continues to pay homage to the Hollywood films he loves with this trifle of a romantic comedy. He blends a Jazz Age story with European locations, 1930s Rom Com style, and his modern Allen-esque editing. It doesn’t always make for a thrilling ride; in fact, it can seem quite mechanical.

The problem is that – without the black and white cinematography and old Hollywood sense of pace and grand style – this short film actually feels longish and completely uninspiring. As a 1930s film, it wouldn’t even be a classic – perhaps more admired for its style over substance, a way to fill the 2 A.M. slot on Turner Classic Movies.

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