Yankees unveil plaque commemorating Stonewall Inn uprising

By : Wire Report
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ABOVE: N.Y. Yankees unveil plaque honoring The Stonewall Inn riots. (Photo from Twitter)

NEW YORK (AP) | A plaque in Monument Park at Yankee Stadium has been dedicated to commemorate the Stonewall Inn uprising 50 years ago, which sparked a pivotal rebellion in the LGBTQ rights movement.

The plaque was unveiled June 25 before New York played the Toronto Blue Jays. It is located on a wall alongside tablets honoring Jackie Robinson and Nelson Mandela for their work fighting prejudice, breaking barriers and creating equality.

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Remembering Judy — is her Stonewall connection reality or myth?

By : Brian T. Carney OF THE WASHINGTON BLADE, COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL LGBT MEDIA ASSOCIATION
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ABOVE: Judy Garland with co-star James Mason in ‘A Star is Born.’ (Photo courtesy AFI)

June 2019 marks not only the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, but also the 50th anniversary of the death of queer icon Judy Garland, as well as the anniversary of her birth in 1922.

In the early stories about the insurrection, there was a direct connection between the two events. Garland died in London on June 22, just 12 days after her 47th birthday. On June 26, her remains were flown to Manhattan; thousands of devastated fans came to pay their respects and the funeral parlor had to remain open all night long to accommodate overflow crowds.

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Adele and Jennifer Lawrence whoop it up at NYC gay bar

By : wire report
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NEW YORK (AP) | Bar patrons in New York’s Greenwich Village were in the right place at the right time when Adele and Jennifer Lawrence showed up.

The Daily News reports Grammy-winning singer Adele and her Oscar-winning actress pal hit the gay bar Pieces on March 22, to the delight of the crowd.

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LGBT History Project: Tea With No Shade

By : Rebecca Huff, SPECIAL TO WATERMARK FROM THE LGBT HISTORY PROJECT
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A gloomy, rainy Sunday in September couldn’t stop what was originally planned as an outdoor tea dance among the trees and fountains of Washington Park in Cincinnati. The gay tradition, revived last year in Ohio by a couple who lost their go-to bar, simply moved across the street and indoors.

Even inside the majestic, century-old Memorial Hall, though, Cincinnati’s 2018 version of the tea dance is still far more out-in-the-open than events of old. The once- or twice-monthly dances rotate from location to location in Southwest Ohio and Northern Kentucky, from hotel ballrooms to restaurant rooftops and theater lobbies to straight bars.

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LGBT historic site projects continue under Trump

By : Lou Chibbaro Jr OF THE WASHINGTON BLADE, COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL LGBT MEDIA ASSOCIATION
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ABOVE: The National Park Service under Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has, so far, continued to include LGBT sites in the National Register of Historic Places. Photo by Gage Skidmore; courtesy Flickr.

The National Park Service last year approved at least four LGBT-related sites for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places as well as a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Gender and Sexuality Equality that’s expected to conduct research on women’s and LGBT civil rights issues.

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Rainbow flag flies at US monument, but not on federal land

By : Wire Report
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NEW YORK (AP) – Gay rights activists who worked to get a rainbow flag installed permanently at the newly created Stonewall National Monument are upset the National Park Service says the flag isn’t actually on federal land but on property owned by the city.

The distinction may seem like a minor one because the flag is still flying either way. But to the group that had lobbied for the flag to be added to the site, the Park Service’s surprise announcement that the city, not the federal government, would be maintaining the flag and its pole seemed like a betrayal.

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Stonewall Rebellion: It wasn’t Judy!

By : Perry Brass
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Judy Garland, while a gay icon, was not the reason for the Stonewall riots in 1969.

Many things have been said and written about “Stonewall,” the historic confrontation in June 1969 after a police raid at the Stonewall Inn, a Mafia-run gay bar on Christopher Street in New York City’s Greenwich Village that ignited the Gay Revolution—and an incredible change in attitudes and feelings about queer people throughout the world.

Among them, it happened on the night of a full moon, so a lot of the craziness on the streets can be blamed on that—not true. Another rumor is that it was all sparked by the death—and funeral, at Frank E. Campbell’s mortuary, uptown on Madison Avenue and 83rd, around the corner from the Metropolitan Museum—of gay icon Judy Garland. The “girls” were just so discombobulated by grief that they let go of all restraint and started breaking windows, uprooting parking meters (remember them?), throwing 40-pound garbage cans through the windows and even biting cops on the legs.

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NY commission seeks artists to create LGBT memorial

By : Wire Report
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ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) – A state commission is searching for artists to design an LGBT memorial honoring victims of hate, intolerance and violence, including those killed in June’s attack in an Orlando gay nightclub.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced the memorial and established a commission to create it in the wake of the Orlando shootings that killed 49 people.

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Famed photographer Mark Seliger captures trans community in new book

By : Wire Report
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NEW YORK (AP) – Nearly 50 years have passed since police raided New York’s Stonewall Inn, touching off protests on Christopher Street that fueled the LGBT movement.

To mark the moment, the popular bar and haven for homeless youth, sex workers, trans people and others in search of community and self was designated a national park in June by President Barack Obama.

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Stonewall Inn announced as first national monument for gay rights

By : Wire Report
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President Barack Obama created the first national monument to gay rights on June 24, designating the iconic Stonewall Inn in Manhattan where the modern gay rights movement took root nearly five decades ago.

The Stonewall National Monument will cover a 7.7 acre swath of Greenwich Village, including the tavern, the small, adjacent park called Christopher Park and the surrounding streets where people rioted after the gay bar was raided by police in 1969. Obama said the monument would “tell the story of our struggle for LGBT rights” and of a civil rights movement that became a part of America.

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