Women in the Arts Awards

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The annual Celebrating the Genius of Women art exhibition features local, national and international artists who have entered artwork for consideration in the annual Women in the Arts Inc. competition. Join us in the main lobby to meet the artists and participate in an interactive gallery walk, immediately followed by the awards ceremony.

Celebrating the Genius of Women

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The annual Celebrating the Genius of Women art exhibition features local, national and international artists who have entered artwork for consideration in the annual Women in the Arts Inc. competition.

EXHIBITION OPENING RECEPTION FOR “STATE OF EXCELLENCE”

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Join us as we celebrate the opening of our spring exhibition State of Excellence: Treasures from Florida Private Collections.

State of Excellence presents more than 100 works of art from outstanding private collections throughout the state of Florida. Focusing on American and European art, the exhibition will include paintings, drawings, sculpture, photography and significant decorative works from the 16th century through the mid-20th century.

Showcasing art and collections that are not otherwise available to the public, State of Excellence will bring new recognition to the depth and breadth of collecting in Florida today. This exhibition is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program.

Towards Impressionism: Landscape Painting from Corot to Monet

By : Alex Storer
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Description:The Musée des Beaux Arts in Reims owns one of the largest collections of French 19th century landscape paintings, forty-five of which will be displayed in this exhibition. Towards Impressionism: Landscape Painting from Corot to Monet, curated and managed by Art Centre Basel in collaboration with the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Reims and the City of Reims, France, marks the first time that an exhibition drawn exclusively from the Reims Museum will travel to the United States; the Cornell Fine Arts Museum in Winter Park, FL, is one of only two venues nationwide to host this extraordinary collection. The exhibition traces the revolutionary evolution of landscape painting in France from the romantics to the School of Barbizon, the circle of Honfleur, and up to Impressionism.

The Barbizonists, who found their major inspiration in Dutch landscape art, were active roughly from 1830 until 1870. Their name derives from the village of Barbizon, on the edge of the Fontainebleau forest, where artists like Théodore Rousseau, Camille Corot, Charles-François Daubigny, Henri-Jospeh Harpignies, Narcisse Virgilio Diaz de la Peña, Jean-François Millet and others gathered, usually at the Auberge Ganne. These artists rejected urban life and burgeoning industrialization, seeking untouched nature in its original form. They were fascinated by the mysteries of the forest and the rural tradition later described by George Sand in her ‘Pastoral Novels’. Théodore Rousseau (1812-1867) was a friend of the novelist and acted as the leader of the Barbizon School. Rousseau rebelled against official art teaching, adopting thickly applied paint in contrast to the smooth surfaces to be seen in academic paintings.

One of the most significant painters involved with the Barbizon School is Camille Corot (1796-1875). Reims is proud to possess the second largest collection of his work after the Louvre: twenty-five authenticated works, part of which will be displayed in this exhibition.

‘The Fountain at Villa Medici’ (1825 -28) will remind visitors of Corot’s first trip to Italy in 1825. On his arrival in Rome he was immediately dazzled by the southern light that was to become one of the principal subjects of his work. Corot never forgot these formative years, idealizing the landscapes he had studied in the open air as he recreated them later in his studio, such as ‘Souvenir du Lac d’Albano’ (before 1862). Later works herald impressionism, reminding the visitor that Corot was interested in the ever changing flow of time and atmospheric effects, painting the same motif at different times of day.

The exhibition presented here will display 45 works in total, by several School of Barbizon painters active after 1830 and by the small artists’ circle founded by Eugène Boudin in Honfleur around 1850, to which Courbet, Isabey and Jongkind belonged. Our exhibition will also display other excellent paintings from the museum’s collection of Impressionists, including works by Monet, Renoir, and Pissarro.

The full list of artists displayed in this exhibition is as follows: Antoine Barye, Jean-Victor Bertin, Eugène Boudin, Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot, Gustave Courbet, Charles-Francois Daubigny, Narcisse Virgille Diaz de la Peña, Jules Dupré, Henri-Joseph Harpignies, Charles Jacque, Stanislas Lépine, Georges Michel, Jean-Francois Millet, Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Auguste-Francois Ravier, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Théodore Rousseau, Constant Troyon and Félix Ziem.

FREE ADMISSION courtesy of PNC Financial Services Group.

Image:  Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot (French, 1796 – 1875), La vasque de la Villa Médicis (Medici Fountain), After 1845, Oil on canvas, 7 1/16 × 11 1/4 in. © Musée des Beaux-Arts, Reims, Legacy Henry Marcel. Photo: C. Devleeschauwer

Ria Brodell: Devotion

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On view through May 13, 2018
Free Admission courtesy of PNC Financial Services Group

Ria Brodell: Devotion disrupts traditional narratives and offers multifaceted ways in which to experience the concept of devotion. While Brodell’s art stems from personal experience, the works in this exhibition allow for a nuanced rumination on gender and sexuality from both historical and contemporary contexts.

The exhibition includes works from the artist’s series, Butch Heroes and The Handsome & The HolyButch Heroes presents highly detailed paintings of historical subjects who challenged gender norms. The paintings incorporate the structure of Catholic prayer cards; the artist’s aesthetic approach is deeply informed by a Catholic upbringing. These meticulous paintings are accompanied by scholarly documentation of the subjects portrayed. In explaining the motivations of an earlier series, The Handsome & The Holy, the artist writes, “I am interested in the play between queer desire and the construction of gender identity as seen alongside my religious upbringing. This series of work attempts to catalog the influential, yet seemingly paradoxical, figures in my personal history.”

Featuring new and recent work by Brodell, this exhibition recontextualizes devotional imagery in the permanent collection of the Cornell Fine Arts Museum. Most significantly, Ria Brodell: Devotion allows for complex readings of gender in historic terms and through a religious framework. This exhibition, the artist’s first solo presentation at a museum, is accompanied by a brochure featuring an interview with the artist.

FREE ADMISSION courtesy of PNC Financial Services Group.

Image:  Ria Brodell, Olga Nikolaevna Tsuberbiller, 1885–1975, Russia, Gouache on paper, 11 x 7 in., 2014, Courtesy of the artist and Gallery Kayafas

Exhibit Opening!

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On October 27, the Modernism Museum in Mount Dora, Florida, will open a new exhibition about the design collection of David Bowie.  Entitled Space Oddities: Bowie Sottsass Memphis and shown to the general public for the first time, these designs were created by the Italian supergroup of designers. The exhibit will present a wide range of objects previously in the collection of the superstar performer.

 

Launched in 1981, Memphis was a completely new style statement, and had a huge influence on the look of the decade, from MTV videos to film to fashion. The brash colors, clashing patterns and edgy silhouettes of these objects have come to be synonymous with the 1980s.

 

The leader of Memphis was Ettore Sottsass, arguably the most significant Italian designer of the postwar era, and certainly the most wide-ranging. In his long career, Sottsass not only made experimental furnishings, but also industrial product designs, office suites, graphics, ceramics, and many other genres of object; his curiosity was uncontainable. The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s recent monographic exhibition on the designer attests also to the broad influences he incorporated into his work, many of which found their way into the challenging aesthetic statements of Memphis.

 

Few people were bold enough to furnish their own homes with these radical works. Bowie was one of them. Showing the same unconventional, visionary qualities in his collecting as he did in his music, he acquired a large number of Memphis designs during his lifetime. The majority of these objects will be included in the display at Mount Dora.

 

Beyond the examples from Bowie’s own collection, the museum has gathered together a complete overview of other designs by Memphis. This will be the most comprehensive exhibition of the group’s work ever shown in a museum. Sottsass is particularly well represented, with iconic pieces such as the Carlton and Casablanca sideboards, as well as rare works like the Palm Springs dining table, which features an orange aniline-dyed top.

 

Beyond Sottsass, this definitive show includes work by all the core members of Memphis Among them are: Michele DeLucchi, whose objects often featured strong black and white graphics paired with geometries in bright blue and yellow; Marco Zanini and Matteo Thun, who were particularly active in designing ceramics and glass; Martine Bedin, creator of the endearing Super lamp on wheels; and the couple George Sowden and Nathalie Du Pasquier, known for their innovative work as pattern designers. In addition, the celebrated Tawaraya (a bed shaped like a boxing ring) by Masanori Umeda will be shown complete, with all original accessories – a rare opportunity to see the most monumental work ever produced by Memphis.
In addition to the core group based in Italy, Memphis also invited international designers to contribute to their collections: Peter Shire, a California-based ceramic artist, sculptor, and furniture designer; Michael Graves, the great American postmodern architect; and Shiro Kuramata, the Japanese designer, who brought his magically light touch to objects in transparent acrylic and confetti terrazzo. Space Oddities: Bowie Sottsass Memphis will include capsule displays on all these leading figures in design.

 

Accompanying the wealth of objects on view, the exhibition will also include an interpretive video, featuring gallerist Keith Johnson of Urban Architecture, who has played the leading role in introducing Memphis design to the USA in the 1980s and since; and the exhibition’s guest curator, Glenn Adamson. Previously Head of Research at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, where he co-curated a major exhibition on postmodern art and design, Adamson has also been director of the Museum of Arts and Design in New York City.

 

Visitors to Mount Dora will also be able to enjoy cuisine inspired by the exhibition at the Modernism Museum’s associated restaurant 1921 by Norman Van Aken, the James Beard Award winning chef. Dishes inspired by Bowie’s music will be presented at the restaurant throughout the run of the show.

 

For more information about Space Oddities: Bowie Sottsass Memphis, please contact the Modernism Museum at: 352-385-0034.

 

Exhibit Opening!

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On October 27, the Modernism Museum in Mount Dora, Florida, will open a new exhibition about the design collection of David Bowie.  Entitled Space Oddities: Bowie Sottsass Memphis and shown to the general public for the first time, these designs were created by the Italian supergroup of designers. The exhibit will present a wide range of objects previously in the collection of the superstar performer.

 

Launched in 1981, Memphis was a completely new style statement, and had a huge influence on the look of the decade, from MTV videos to film to fashion. The brash colors, clashing patterns and edgy silhouettes of these objects have come to be synonymous with the 1980s.

 

The leader of Memphis was Ettore Sottsass, arguably the most significant Italian designer of the postwar era, and certainly the most wide-ranging. In his long career, Sottsass not only made experimental furnishings, but also industrial product designs, office suites, graphics, ceramics, and many other genres of object; his curiosity was uncontainable. The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s recent monographic exhibition on the designer attests also to the broad influences he incorporated into his work, many of which found their way into the challenging aesthetic statements of Memphis.

 

Few people were bold enough to furnish their own homes with these radical works. Bowie was one of them. Showing the same unconventional, visionary qualities in his collecting as he did in his music, he acquired a large number of Memphis designs during his lifetime. The majority of these objects will be included in the display at Mount Dora.

 

Beyond the examples from Bowie’s own collection, the museum has gathered together a complete overview of other designs by Memphis. This will be the most comprehensive exhibition of the group’s work ever shown in a museum. Sottsass is particularly well represented, with iconic pieces such as the Carlton and Casablanca sideboards, as well as rare works like the Palm Springs dining table, which features an orange aniline-dyed top.

 

Beyond Sottsass, this definitive show includes work by all the core members of Memphis Among them are: Michele DeLucchi, whose objects often featured strong black and white graphics paired with geometries in bright blue and yellow; Marco Zanini and Matteo Thun, who were particularly active in designing ceramics and glass; Martine Bedin, creator of the endearing Super lamp on wheels; and the couple George Sowden and Nathalie Du Pasquier, known for their innovative work as pattern designers. In addition, the celebrated Tawaraya (a bed shaped like a boxing ring) by Masanori Umeda will be shown complete, with all original accessories – a rare opportunity to see the most monumental work ever produced by Memphis.
In addition to the core group based in Italy, Memphis also invited international designers to contribute to their collections: Peter Shire, a California-based ceramic artist, sculptor, and furniture designer; Michael Graves, the great American postmodern architect; and Shiro Kuramata, the Japanese designer, who brought his magically light touch to objects in transparent acrylic and confetti terrazzo. Space Oddities: Bowie Sottsass Memphis will include capsule displays on all these leading figures in design.

 

Accompanying the wealth of objects on view, the exhibition will also include an interpretive video, featuring gallerist Keith Johnson of Urban Architecture, who has played the leading role in introducing Memphis design to the USA in the 1980s and since; and the exhibition’s guest curator, Glenn Adamson. Previously Head of Research at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, where he co-curated a major exhibition on postmodern art and design, Adamson has also been director of the Museum of Arts and Design in New York City.

 

Visitors to Mount Dora will also be able to enjoy cuisine inspired by the exhibition at the Modernism Museum’s associated restaurant 1921 by Norman Van Aken, the James Beard Award winning chef. Dishes inspired by Bowie’s music will be presented at the restaurant throughout the run of the show.

 

For more information about Space Oddities: Bowie Sottsass Memphis, please contact the Modernism Museum at: 352-385-0034.

 

Exhibit Opening!

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Share this story:

On October 27, the Modernism Museum in Mount Dora, Florida, will open a new exhibition about the design collection of David Bowie.  Entitled Space Oddities: Bowie Sottsass Memphis and shown to the general public for the first time, these designs were created by the Italian supergroup of designers. The exhibit will present a wide range of objects previously in the collection of the superstar performer.

 

Launched in 1981, Memphis was a completely new style statement, and had a huge influence on the look of the decade, from MTV videos to film to fashion. The brash colors, clashing patterns and edgy silhouettes of these objects have come to be synonymous with the 1980s.

 

The leader of Memphis was Ettore Sottsass, arguably the most significant Italian designer of the postwar era, and certainly the most wide-ranging. In his long career, Sottsass not only made experimental furnishings, but also industrial product designs, office suites, graphics, ceramics, and many other genres of object; his curiosity was uncontainable. The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s recent monographic exhibition on the designer attests also to the broad influences he incorporated into his work, many of which found their way into the challenging aesthetic statements of Memphis.

 

Few people were bold enough to furnish their own homes with these radical works. Bowie was one of them. Showing the same unconventional, visionary qualities in his collecting as he did in his music, he acquired a large number of Memphis designs during his lifetime. The majority of these objects will be included in the display at Mount Dora.

 

Beyond the examples from Bowie’s own collection, the museum has gathered together a complete overview of other designs by Memphis. This will be the most comprehensive exhibition of the group’s work ever shown in a museum. Sottsass is particularly well represented, with iconic pieces such as the Carlton and Casablanca sideboards, as well as rare works like the Palm Springs dining table, which features an orange aniline-dyed top.

 

Beyond Sottsass, this definitive show includes work by all the core members of Memphis Among them are: Michele DeLucchi, whose objects often featured strong black and white graphics paired with geometries in bright blue and yellow; Marco Zanini and Matteo Thun, who were particularly active in designing ceramics and glass; Martine Bedin, creator of the endearing Super lamp on wheels; and the couple George Sowden and Nathalie Du Pasquier, known for their innovative work as pattern designers. In addition, the celebrated Tawaraya (a bed shaped like a boxing ring) by Masanori Umeda will be shown complete, with all original accessories – a rare opportunity to see the most monumental work ever produced by Memphis.
In addition to the core group based in Italy, Memphis also invited international designers to contribute to their collections: Peter Shire, a California-based ceramic artist, sculptor, and furniture designer; Michael Graves, the great American postmodern architect; and Shiro Kuramata, the Japanese designer, who brought his magically light touch to objects in transparent acrylic and confetti terrazzo. Space Oddities: Bowie Sottsass Memphis will include capsule displays on all these leading figures in design.

 

Accompanying the wealth of objects on view, the exhibition will also include an interpretive video, featuring gallerist Keith Johnson of Urban Architecture, who has played the leading role in introducing Memphis design to the USA in the 1980s and since; and the exhibition’s guest curator, Glenn Adamson. Previously Head of Research at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, where he co-curated a major exhibition on postmodern art and design, Adamson has also been director of the Museum of Arts and Design in New York City.

 

Visitors to Mount Dora will also be able to enjoy cuisine inspired by the exhibition at the Modernism Museum’s associated restaurant 1921 by Norman Van Aken, the James Beard Award winning chef. Dishes inspired by Bowie’s music will be presented at the restaurant throughout the run of the show.

 

For more information about Space Oddities: Bowie Sottsass Memphis, please contact the Modernism Museum at: 352-385-0034.

 

Exhibition Opening Reception and Performance

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The Florida Holocaust Museum is pleased to present the exhibition The Holocaust and the Book of Fire by Murray Zimiles. The exhibition opening reception will take place on Saturday, September 9th at 5:30 p.m. and in conjunction with Keep St Pete Lit and the Second Saturday ArtWalk, nine writers will perform their short stories, poems, and imaginings inspired by this exhibition.

The paintings, drawings, prints, and artist’s books by Murray Zimiles are graphic statements meant to engage and propel the viewer into a whirlwind of fire and devastation. In these powerful works, Zimiles deals with the perceived absence of God and the absence of civilization during the Holocaust.

The exhibition opening reception and performance is free and open to the public. Complimentary beer, wine, and snacks will be served. To reserve your seat, please call 727.820.0100, extension 301.

Cornell Fine Arts Museum Artist’s Talk: Patrick Martinez

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Join artist Patrick Martinez as he talks about his work and exhibiton American Memorial, on view at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum through September 10.

In Martinez’s work, memorials take myriad forms. The act of mourning offers an opportunity to express pain and to demonstrate respect. In public, mourning can function as a political protest, a defiant act, and ultimately an expression of love. Memorials exist as material manifestations of grief.

Hip Hop culture and graffiti served as early influences for the artist. He remains in tune with popular culture, and is deeply concerned with current events. With his neons, the artist reimagines texts that reflect hard realities, truths, and embody struggle and fear. These words become amplified and reverberate in our collective consciousness. For example, in free 99 (hold ya head), Martinez uses the lyrics of the deceased rapper Tupac Shakur, “Currency means nothin’ if you still ain’t free.” The artist often employs deceptively playful materials like neon and draws from popular sources like rap music to produce deeply poignant and timely work.

In other recent works, Martinez, inspired by Pee Chee school folders and rendered in both paint and print, creates sensitive portrayals of people who too often are depicted without respect and dignity. Most specifically, the artist presents people of color who are victims of excessive force and police brutality. His early success as an illustrator and designer for record labels enables his multilayered subversion of the Pee Chee series.

A number of paintings in the show pay tribute to floral memorials. The ubiquitous use of flowers to commemorate loss or in some cases, the intervention of flowers in daily life that inspire a meditation on the meaning of beauty emanate from these works. With a colorful palette, the artist leverages certain aesthetics that reflect both individual and communal pain. His neon that states “Then they came for me” haunts as a reminder of the fragility of personal safety and of a just society.

Born in 1980, Martinez lives and works in Los Angeles, California. This exhibition marks the artist’s first solo exhibition at a museum.

Click here to view Patrick Martinez’s insights on his work in this exhibition.

Free admission courtesy Dale Montgomery ’60
No reservation required

London exhibit examines history of human sexuality

By : Wire Report
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LONDON (AP) – Curators at London’s Wellcome Collection will not be surprised if lines form outside their new “Institute of Sexology” exhibition.

“It’s free and it’s got sex in the title,” co-curator Kate Ford said Nov. 19.

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