Cate Blanchett defends straight actors portraying LGBT characters

By : MARIAH COOPER OF THE WASHINGTON BLADE, COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL LGBT MEDIA ASSOCIATION
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Actress Cate Blanchett believes straight actors shouldn’t receive backlash for portraying LGBT roles.

Blanchett, 49, received critical acclaim for her role as a lesbian woman in the film “Carol.” According to the Hollywood Reporter, Blanchett defended straight actors taking on LGBT roles as she did during a Q&A at the Rome Film Festival.

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“Great Comet,” “Hello Dolly!” lead Tony nods

By : Wire Report
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NEW YORK (AP) – “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812,” a musical that dramatizes a 70-page melodrama at the center of Leo Tolstoy’s “War and Peace,” earned a leading 12 Tony Award nominations on Tuesday, which also saw nods for Bette Midler, Kevin Kline, Josh Groban, Danny DeVito and Cate Blanchett.

Groban earned a nod for portraying – in a fat suit – an unhappy husband in “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812.” His musical will now compete for the best new musical Tony with “Come From Away,” ”Dear Evan Hansen” and “Groundhog Day.”

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Screened Out – Carol

By : Stephen Miller
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Cate Blanchett, Rooney Mara, Kyle Chandler, Sarah Paulson

Director Todd Haynes has done it again with this beautiful, tense and emotional film – tapping into the mid-20th century to create an immediate and riveting story. His 2002 film Far from Heaven and his 2011 miniseries Mildred Pierce both displayed this specific talent. Now, his version of Patricia Highsmith’s shocking 1953 lesbian love story The Price of Salt is turned into brilliant cinema about forbidden love, strong women, and sexual politics.

Not only is the film’s photography and 1950s style rich and alluring. Blanchett and Mara both deliver simmering, strained performances worthy of the highest praise.

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Todd Haynes’ Lesbian Romance ‘Carol’ Wows Cannes Film Festival

By : Wire Report
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CANNES, France (AP) – Todd Haynes’ 1950s lesbian romance Carol with Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara, had the Cannes Film Festival swooning after its premiere.

The long-in-development adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s novel was received rapturously at Cannes for its tale of an illicit love between two women amid conservative ’50s New York. Speaking to reporters May 17, Blanchett said Carol is more than a period piece.

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Screened Out – Cinderella

By : Stephen Miller
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Lily James, Cate Blanchett, Richard Madden, Helena Bonham Carter, Holliday Grainger, Sophie McShera, Stellan Skarsgård, Hayley Atwell, Ben Chaplin, Derek Jacobi

Kenneth Branagh’s Cinderella walks the line between the fantasy of the Disney animated version and the realism of Ever After. Disney also produces this retelling; it’s charming, sumptuous, and extraordinarily well acted, even as it eschews taking any risks whatsoever.

There’s just enough sparkle here to make this a perfect family flick. Disney chose this as their spring break film; that was a smart marketing choice.

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Screened Out – The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies

By : Stephen Miller
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Martin Freeman, Ian McKellen, Richard Armitage, Lee Pace, Orlando Bloom, Evangeline Lily, Aidan Turner, Luke Evans, Cate Blanchett, Christopher Lee, Billy Connolly

Eleven years ago, Peter Jackson did a sound job making J.R.R. Tolkien’s beloved Lord of the Rings into a thrilling epic – sprawling and yet still focused on character. Arguably, The Hobbit should have been easier; the story is shorter and less complex. Instead, Jackson hasn’t been able to make this trilogy very compelling at all.

The main problem is that Jackson continually loses his protagonist, the diminutive hobbit Bilbo Baggins (Freeman). Bilbo should’ve started out as a scared little guy who learns the powers and dangers of adventure, who gains some life-changing experience. Instead, he is sprinkled throughout the films. This last film is just prolonged, gory battles barely broken up by comic and dramatic bits. There are a lot of bombastic speeches, but Jackson gives us little reason to care.

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