Screened Out – Manchester by the Sea

By : Stephen Miller
Comments: 0

Casey Affleck, Michelle Williams, Lucas Hedges, Kyle Chandler, C.J. Wilson

It’s an extraordinarily rare gift when a film is so beautifully, so honestly acted. Tragic things may happen – and a heaping lot of tragedy strikes Manchester by the Sea. Yet the film fills us with joy.

We watch damaged humans do silly and honest things. And then we say to ourselves, “Ah, yes, that’s exactly what would happen.”

There’s no doubt that Manchester deserves its Oscar nominations for picture, director, writer, actor, supporting actor, and supporting actress.

Continue Reading >>

Screened Out – The Finest Hours

By : Stephen Miller
Comments: 0

Chris Evans, Casey Affleck, Holliday Grainger, Ben Foster, Eric Bana

It is considered the US Coast Guard’s most daring rescue – a “suicide mission” to save nearly 30 men. A horrible winter storm was tearing up the Massachusetts coast, and a huge oil tanker had torn in half.

Disney does the Disney thing bringing this heroic story to life, adding neat-o 1950s art direction, a swell score, great visuals, action, romance and bravado. Sure, the ship runs into a few clichés, but it’s a sight better than most January releases.

Continue Reading >>

Screened Out – Interstellar

By : Stephen Miller
Comments: 0

Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Jessica Chastain, Michael Caine, Topher Grace, Mackenzie Foy, Timothée Chalame, Casey Affleck, Wes Bentley, John Lithgow

Interstellar is a melodramatic sci-fi quest that taps into our fears of self-destruction and our hopes for redemption. Certain scenes occur in a cornfield; this entire flick has some corn sprinkled throughout it.

I admit I wasn’t expected this sort of sappiness from Christopher Nolan (Memento, The Dark Knight trilogy, Inception). He always makes thought-provoking pieces; Interstellar is no exception. However, this space epic also has quite a bit of emotional drip about it, too – poetry quoting, repeated apologizing. The acting is committed, and the scenery and technical aspects amazing. Yet Interstellar – at 2 hours and 49 minutes – tries too hard to make us cry. Repeatedly.

Continue Reading >>